No More Victims by Natasha Cooper

A ‘Most Wanted’ title from Barrington Stoke

Ben was picked on at school. Now he’s dead – stabbed in the street, and left to bleed to death.

The police are hunting the killer. Candy thinks she knows who did it, and she wants him sent down.

But what if Candy’s wrong?

It took me a while to finally track down this book, having read and enjoyed all of the other ‘Most Wanted’ titles from Barrington Stoke (Sawbones by Stuart MacBride, The Chop by Graham Hurley, Heroes by Anne Perry and Kill Clock by Allan Guthrie).

The books are designed as an easier read from all of the authors involved in terms of the structure and language used in the books, to encourage reluctant readers to pick them up and race through them (No More Victims clocks in at just 119 pages and I read it in one sitting – they make the ideal travelling companion).

No More Victims is a sad tale due to its subject matter – influenced by the unfortunate and depressingly regular headlines we read of bullying in schools,and of children becoming the victims (and often perpetrators) of knife crime. It’s the story of three boys and the parents around them, those who believe their sons could do no wrong and those who are unsure as to what their children are up to when out of their sight. With fingers pointing at a violent stepfather, a missing knife and a history of violence which may or may not be influencing a cover up or a hidden agenda, this is a snappy, thought-provoking and, sadly, realistic tale of violent crime.

If you’ve not read one of the ‘Most Wanted’ titles do seek them out, as they present new challenges to great authors, all of whom have stepped up to the mark admirably, with this from Natasha Cooper being no exception.

You can order ‘No More Victims’ here.

And Natasha Cooper (as NJ Cooper) will be at this year’s Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate in July – so you can book to meet her and a whole host of great crime authors by clicking here.

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